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Monday, July 24, 2017

The Cafe by the Sea


Book #56 Read in 2017
The Café by the Sea by Jenny Colgan

Colgan is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors.  In this book, Flora works at a London law firm and is needed by a client to return to her Scottish hometown, something she has avoided for the past few years.  Her homecoming is not easy, nor is her growing crush on her boss.  Colgan creates interesting characters, full of humor and angst and full of engagement.  This was a good, quick read.  I borrowed it from the public library.


Saturday, July 15, 2017

Molly and the Cat Cafe


Book #55 Read in 2017
Molly and the Cat Café by Melissa Daley

This is the first in a cute series.  Molly is a cat who has had a good home with Margery.  But things change when Margery becomes ill and her son puts her in a nursing home.  He rehomes Molly, and this begins her journey to find another owner like Margery.  After some time on the streets, Molly sets her sights on Debbie, owner of a café.  Will Molly's presence help or hurt the café?  Will she be able to stay in her new home forever?  This was a cute read with humor, romance and of course cats in it.  I borrowed the book from the public library.  The sequel is on its way to me.

Thursday, July 13, 2017

El Deafo


Book #54 Read in 2017
El Deafo by Cece Bell

This is a graphic novel that tells the story of Cece, a young girl who is deaf.  She has to wear a contraption to school that includes a microphone for her teachers to use so she can hear their instruction.  Cece feels very obtrusive wearing it and begins to imagine her alter ego--"El Deafo" who has superpowers and the confidence Cece does not have.  This book spans several years of her schooling and shows the ups and downs of her interactions with her family, friends, teachers and strangers.  I plan on using this book with the students in my Young Adult Literature class in the fall.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters


Book #53 Read in 2017
Disrupting Thinking:  Why How We Read Matters by Kylene Beers and Robert E. Probst

This was a decent professional read.  It was a little text booky (Donalyn Miller is still my favorite!) but it was full of good information about how making reading meaningful to and for students is so important.  Letting students choose their reads, making what they are reading relevant to them are key components to building a successful reading community in the classroom.  I enjoyed it.

Saturday, July 8, 2017

The Darkest Hour


Book #52 Read in 2017
The Darkest Hour by Caroline Tung Richmond

This is a good piece of historical fiction, geared towards young adults.  Lucie is a member of Covert Operations fighting against the Nazis.  She is not always sure who to trust and who not to trust.  Her life is constantly in danger and this book will keeps readers hooked to see if she makes it out alive.  This book has good action, good historical perspective and interesting characters.  I recommend it for high school readers as well as adults.  I received a copy of this book from Amazon Vine in exchange for a honest review.

Sunday, July 2, 2017

The Crossover


Book #51 Read in 2017
The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

This book is so much more than a sports novel for young adult readers.  Told in verse, this book tells the story of Josh, a middle school basketball player dealing with a lot of emotional issues in his life.  His twin brother has just started dating his first girlfriend, his father is sick....and Josh does not know how to always handle his emotions in the proper way.  This book is a powerful read and will resonate with high school readers as well as adult readers.  I see myself recommending it to my students in the fall.

Saturday, July 1, 2017

The Hate U Give


Book #50 Read in 2017
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

This is an excellent book which I would recommend to young adult and adults readers alike.  It is a powerful read.  Starr witnesses her friend Khahil being shot to death by a police officer who thought he had a gun (it was a hairbrush).  Starr needs to tell what happens but that is easier said than done.  This book accurately portrays the difficulty of race relations and police brutality.  Well done.  I borrowed this book from the public library.